Jump to content


Will Low Blood Oxygen Levels Kill You?


4 replies to this topic

#1 Dee

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,487 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 30 September 2009 - 09:27 AM

Will Low Blood Oxygen Levels Kill You?

Low oxygen levels will kill you slowly, OR can kill you instantly.

For years I worked in a very large hospital in Tacoma, Washington. I can not count the times that I have been part of a CPR effort on someone who had taken their oxygen off to get out of bed, and then experienced a cardiac arrest in the bathroom.

Very low oxygen levels can cause stimulation of your vagus nerve, which can stop your heart. Bearing down can also stimulate the vagus nerve.

You do NOT want to have low oxygen levels when you are sitting on the toilet!

2am, lunch time for night shift, the familiar bells, bing-bing-bing. Code 4 room xyz, Code 4 room xyz!

Instead of lunch, we were on our knees in shit, trying to save someones life.

You WANT to meet your oxygen needs, especially when you are on the toilet.

If you have low blood oxygen levels any time you exert yourself, sleep, habitually hold your breath, or anything else you might do, you are robbing your vital organs of the oxygen needed for wellness.

If you have low blood oxygen levels you WILL lose your eye sight, your short term memory, your strength, and your charming disposition.

Guaranteed.

If your low blood oxygen levels become extreme enough (low 80% to upper 70% oxygen saturation), you face the possibility that your heart will spontaneously stop.

If you choose not to treat low oxygen levels you face the deterioration of your quality of life, and the possibility of sudden death!

However, if you

treat every occurrence of low blood oxygen level (anything below 92% oxygen saturation)
faithfully practice breathing and relaxation exercises
try to be as active as possible without depleting your blood oxygen level
You may regain quality of life, avoid further deterioration, and even reverse disease while building your health.

Will low blood oxygen levels kill you?

Yes, most definitely!

Can high blood oxygen levels heal you?

The good news is that exercising with supplemental oxygen can actually reverse low blood oxygen levels in some cases.

If you have low blood oxygen levels, and you don’t want to fade away, or suddenly drop dead:

* Use supplemental oxygen with every activity that causes low blood oxygen levels.
Supplemental oxygen should be used 24 hours a day if there is any sign of low blood oxygen level at rest.
* Practice relaxing everyday! Tension is the biggest obstacle to fully utilizing your lungs.
* Do deep breathing exercises everyday following relaxation.
* Get WELL OXYGENATED activity every day.
* Eat foods in as close to a natural state as possible.
* Use potassium chloride instead of table salt.
* Avoid sugar and sweeteners.
* Sip pure water all day every day.
* Get 30 minutes of direct sunlight everyday.
* Laugh, laugh, laugh. It really is the best medicine!

http://www.heartfailuresolutions.com/oxyge...levels-kill-you
Posted Image

#2 Darrell

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,614 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax, VA
  • Interests:Fitness, family and community activities.

Posted 30 September 2009 - 09:56 AM

Is anyone familiar with potassium chloride as a salt substitute?

#3 Dee

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,487 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 30 September 2009 - 11:36 AM

Salt substitute

Posted Image
Posted Image

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

High intake of table salt (sodium chloride) is associated with high blood pressure and an increased risk of cardiovascular disease.[1] Salt substitutes are low-sodium alternatives designed to taste similar. They usually contain mostly potassium chloride, whose toxicity is approximately equal to that of table salt in a healthy person (the LD50 is about 2.5 g/kg, or approximately 190 g for a person weighing 75 kg). Potassium lactate may also be used to reduce sodium levels in food products. It is commonly used in meat and poultry products.[2] The RDA of potassium is higher than that for sodium,[3] yet a typical person consumes less potassium than sodium in a given day.[4]

However, various diseases and medications may decrease the body's excretion of potassium, thereby increasing the risk of potentially fatal hyperkalemia. People with kidney failure, heart failure or diabetes should not use salt substitutes without medical advice. A manufacturer, LoSalt, has issued an advisory statement.[5] that people taking the following prescription drugs should not use a salt substitute: amiloride, triamterene, Dytac, Captopril & angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors, spironolactone, Aldactone, Eplerenone, and Inspra.

Hydrolyzed protein[6] or 5'-nucleotides[7] are sometimes added to potassium chloride to improve the flavour of salt substitutes.
Posted Image

#4 Darrell

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 2,614 posts
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Fairfax, VA
  • Interests:Fitness, family and community activities.

Posted 30 September 2009 - 01:56 PM

A lot of warnings either way. Best to study first and then decide if it's right for you.
Darrell

#5 Dee

    Advanced Member

  • Admin
  • PipPipPip
  • 7,487 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling

Posted 30 September 2009 - 02:15 PM

As you already know, Darrell, it is always best to check with our doctors first. I can't use a salt substitute because of medication I take, so I just don't use it. My problem is all of the salt in processed foods. I noticed the other day on a label, that 1/4 teaspoon of salt equals 25% of the amount we are allowed daily. Boy, it doesn't take much to reach 100%.
Posted Image





1 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 1 guests, 0 anonymous users